American Cars

Top Muscle Cars
The 1964 Pontiac GTO was considered the pioneer in muscle cars. "GTO" stood for Gran Turismo Omologato. The first generation of GTOs (until 1973) was based on two other existing models, the Pontiac Tempest and LeMans.
The name GTO was coined by Pontiac’s Chief Engineer John DeLorean, who was motivated by Ferrari 250 GTO.
1967 Pontiac GTO. 1967 marked the first availability of ram air through a functional hood scoop on the GTO. It was a 400-cubic-inch V-8, delivering 360 horsepower. The high output engine produced the most power for that year at 360 hp (270 kW) at 5100 rpm, and produced 438 lb·ft at 3600 rpm.
1968 Plymouth Road Runner Hemi. The Plymouth Road Runner Hemi was pure brawn with a 425-horsepower, 426-cubic-inch Hemi V-8 engine.

Plymouth licensed the Road Runner name and likeness from Warner Brothers.

It went a step further by developing a horn sound imitating the cartoon bird's "beep-beep,"
1969 Ford Mustang Boss 429. Fewer than 1,400 were built between 1969 and 1970. Its 429-cubic-inch V-8 engine delivered 375-horsepower. It was basically hand-built. Ford farmed out its assembly to Michigan-based Kar Kraft. Very little distinguished the Boss 429 other than a hood scoop and trunk-mounted spoiler.
<1969 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1. With fewer than 70 ever built, the '69 ZL1 had the most powerful Chevrolet engine offered to the public for decades. It's the rarest production car Chevrolet ever made.

Based on Chevrolet's iconic 427 V-8 engine, the ZL power plant had an aluminum block in place of the regular 427's iron one. Although it was officially rated at the regular 427's 430 horsepower, testers pegged the output as being much higher.
1970 Buick GSX Stage 1. Of the 687 GSXs built, 488 were ordered with the Stage 1 upgrade. By 1970, a 455-cubic-inch V-8 engine powered the Gran Sport. It produced a hefty 510 pounds-foot of torque.
1970 Plymouth Barracuda 1970 Plymouth Barracuda, the big dog, was armed with the dual-carburetor, 426-cubic-inch Hemi that whipped up 425 horsepower. The Hemi 'Cuda could go toe to toe with the era's top-tier muscle cars, as the carmaker gave its muscle cars a suspension tailored to heavy-metal acceleration.
1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 454. Chevrolet offered two versions of the 454-cubic-inch V-8. The LS5 generated 360 horsepower, while the LS6 punched out a whopping 450. It's the LS6 version, with its Holley four-barrel carburetor, that put the SS 454 on the map. No other muscle car would equal the horsepower wallop of the 1970 SS 454.